Louisa George with Giveaway of The War Hero's Locked-Away Heart!

Today we have author Louisa George and she's talking on POV. She's also giving away a copy of her THE WAR HERO's LOCKED-AWAY HEART!

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 Over to Louisa now....


Hi Romance Readers! So kind of you guys to have me back! I really enjoy blogging with you all.

 

Point Of View

 

Who’s head do you like to be in when you read a story? I guess, traditionally in romance it’s mainly been the heroine’s- but now I would say in the books I read it’s probably more like 60% heroine, 40% hero.

 

One thing that challenges me as a writer is being in the hero’s headspace. I live with my husband of nearly 20 years and two teenage boys- so I should probably know the way men think. But, to be honest, I’m woefully bad at reading them. I expect them to think like me- and they most certainly don’t. I expect them to intuit what I want/need and I get flustered and irritated when I have to ask. They never seem to waste time emoting over things- it’s either black or white. Truth is, men and women don’t think the same way at all, so I should definitely depict their emotions and reactions very differently. So when I write from a male POV I’m conscious that they are logical and use different words in short sentences. They rarely wear their hearts on their sleeve. I’m never sure whether I’ve quite pulled it off!

 

Here’s an excerpt from my latest book, The War Hero’s Locked-Away Heart from Adam’s POV:

 

Not on my watch. No-one would die. Not again.

A mouthful of Hauraki Gulf saltwater ran down the back of Adam’s throat as he fought the waves to get to the surfer. He kept his heart rate in check. Used the adrenalin shunting through his veins to fuel actions, not hinder them. Focused his thoughts on saving. Not losing.

Semper agens - Semper quietus. Always alert. Always calm. The medical corps motto beat a regular rhythm to every arm stroke. Fifteen years of service and the rhythm spurred every action, like a heartbeat, a breath. A tattoo engraved on the sinews in his heart.

An elevation. A funeral dirge.

Years of hard army training, honing his body to a rock, moulding his mind to not accept defeat, had brought him to this. Water battered over his head, blurring his vision, testing his nerve. Defeat? He pushed that thought away. The drowning guy needed him. And right now he was the only hope of saving him.

Thick heavy waves dragged him back, just out of reach of the surfer, whose hand now flailed along the top of the water instead of waving. Amazing how exhaustion could rip through a man battling nature in a matter of minutes.

Adam kicked closer. Pain squeezed his leg like a vice. The cold water gripped the ragged scarring, freezing the bits of metal that kept his anklebones attached together. Don’t give in. He pushed all thoughts of pain away. Then lost sight of the man.

Damn. Drawing on all his strength he trod water, got his bearings. Glanced to the shoreline where that strange woman paced and pointed. Damned cheeky but cute. In a weird kind of way. He imagined the deep espresso-colour of her eyes, the crazy half-spiked hair. The intriguing tiny jewel in her nose. Ample curves. Interesting curves.

So not what he needed to be thinking of right now. Or ever.

She gesticulated, and he followed her line to the surfer. He gave her the okay signal.

First time he’d given any woman a second thought since Monica. And here he was in the middle of a rescue operation, neck deep in freezing water. Exactly how he’d felt when they’d ended their fated marriage.

There’s a lesson there.

Focus on the task. ‘Hey, mate! Mate! Over here.’

He got the attention of the guy, who feebly raised his head. Adam saw a huge red gash across his pale forehead. Shark meat too. Great. ‘I’m coming for you. Hold on.’

The lad nodded, then disappeared under a ferocious wave. A few metres away. Metres. Nothing. You can do this.

Adam sucked in air then duck-dived under the current, grabbed for an arm, a limb, some piece of the man. When his hand knocked against something soft he grabbed and kicked to the surface. Bingo.

‘Hold on. I’ve got you.’ He tossed the struggling surfer over onto his back, gripped under his shoulders and kicked towards shore. 'Stop fighting me. It’s all good now. We're okay.'

The woman, her smile broad like a beacon, ran waist-deep into the water and helped drag the surfer to solid ground. Which was just as well, because as Adam met her large kohl-rimmed eyes again the earth seemed to tilt. Just a little.

Maybe it was the shock of the cold air. The shifting of the sand. His leg pinching again. ‘Give me a hand to lie him down. He’s breathing, but he swallowed a good part of that ocean.’

Before he could give her more instruction, she’d flipped the surfer onto his side and was kneeling at his face assessing the wound like a pro. ‘Hey, Lukas. Lukas?’

Slowly their patient focused on her, then coughed. ‘What…?’

‘It’s Skye. It’s okay. You’re safe now. You okay? Took a good dunking, eh?’

Sky? Adam frowned. What the heck kind of name was that? Curious too, that it was the one thing that spooked him. Sky. Open air. Nothing but a long way down to a hard landing. And pain. He shuddered.

Sky. For a name? But it went with the territory. Unconventional. Unpredictable. And right now shivering in a flimsy black sports top and matching running shorts. Sea water had slicked her clothes to her body. Fascinating.

He bent down to help her assess the surfer. Not that she looked like she needed help. She was calm and focused. Unlike him. She was distracting. He was distracted. In every rescue mission he’d ever undertaken he’d never allowed himself to be distracted. Never.


 

 

So, do you prefer reading the hero or the heroine’s POV? Or don’t you really mind- so long as it’s convincingly written?  I’ll give away a book to one commenter!

27 comments:

  1. I too am used to the heroine's POV (probably because I started reading romances back in 1973). However, I have been enjoying reading the hero's POV; sometimes I feel like I have insight into their thinking skills; and other times, I think "that hero is thinking like a woman things; can't be realistic!"
    I guess the bottom line is that I will read all possibilities, but I tend to enjoy both POVs more.

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    1. Hi Laney!

      Thanks for stopping by. I also enjoy reading teh hero's POV as it gives us insight into his feelings.

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    2. Hi Laney! I know what you mean when you say 'the hero is thinking like a woman' - I see that at times too, and try hard not to do that with my own writing (although, who knows if I achieve it- after all, I am a woman!)

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  2. I love reading YA novels from the guy pov. There's a rawness that you don't get in the female pov.

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    1. Hi Stina, I love the way that guys' thinking is so straight forward and usually honest.

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  3. I don't have a preference.

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    1. Hi Chey! That's fine- I'm not sure I do either!

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  4. I enjoy both, but it can be refreshing to read male POV since I read mainly female.

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    1. Hi Medeia! I think it's good to know what each character is thinking.

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  5. It sounds like a male pov to me, but then, I always worry that I'm not capturing a male voice either. Love that name Skye - that's my goddaughter's name!

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    1. Hi Deniz! Glad you like the name. It's always hard when you choose a character's name because they're just someone in your head and you don't know what their personality is going to be like (a bit like naming your babies!). Skye was originally a secondary character in a different book, and I hadn't given much thought to her name other than the fact I liked it- then when I decided to write her story there she was fully formed and I had to fit the story around her.

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  6. I tend to write (and read) about 50/50--so long as the writing is strong, it doesn't change my opinion of a book.

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    1. Hi Golden Eagle! Yeah, I think nowadays a lot of books are 50/50. I read Jodi Picoult books too, though and hers can be up to 4 or 5 different POVs! (That must be hard to write)

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  7. As long as it's convincingly written, I enjoy either.

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    1. Hi Shelly, I agree! Thanks for coming over to see us at the blog today!

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  8. By and large, the heroine's. Now more than ever, some of the writers write the hero's POV and some of them are so convincing. Overall, probably a bit of both is better.

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    1. Hi Maria, yes, the two POVs is getting much more popular, although I've just finished reading a book where the male POV didn't figure at all and I still got the gist of what he was thinking by his dialogue.

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  9. Great to meet you Louisa! I read anything as long as the main character's voice/ or the story itself is interesting. :)
    Nutschell
    www.thewritingnut.com

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    1. Lovely to meet you, too, Nutschell. You're right, so long as the the story is well told the POV shouldn't matter (or stand out particularly)

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  10. I like both points of view, but I much prefer writing the male POV. They're so much easier for me than the women. Not sure why.

    Hi, Nas!

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    1. Hi Carol, now that's very interesting! I wonder why you find men easier to write than women? I always find myself wondering- is this what a man would say/think/do? But when writing a woman I just write what I'm feeling at the time (and imagine it's what the heroine would be feeling)

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  11. I like reading both types of POV, but it's very true that hero POVs should be different.

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  12. Hi Cherie! Thanks for popping in, and for your comment!

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  13. I prefer both actually I like to be able to get to know what both are thinking it brings it all together for me allowing me to better visualise the message the author is bringing to me through her characters.

    Thank you for the giveaway

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  14. I don't mind which POV I read from.

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  15. And the winner of my giveaway is.....Shelly!

    Shelly, please contact me at louisageorge32 (at) gmail (dot) com with your address and I'll pop the book in the post to you!

    Cheers,
    Louisa x

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